QUEBEC TO TRY AGAIN
TO LEAVE CANADIAN UNION

This is a key part of the Illuminati plan to break-up Canada and absorb it into the United States.

The following news report gives the possible time-scale for the next referendum in Quebec. The last one failed narrowly.

David Icke


QUEBEC TO TRY AGAIN TO LEAVE CANADIAN UNION By MICHELLE MACAFEE

QUEBEC (CP) - It will take the Quebec government two years to re-do all the homework needed to prepare for sovereignty because the existing research is outdated, former premier Jacques Parizeau said Wednesday.

But following the Parti Quebecois' "heroic efforts" to bring the province's deficit under control, it could soon start the planning for another referendum before the next election, said Parizeau.

"There are still questions to solve like health, but at one point somebody will say - and that has to be the premier - I push the button and we start," said Parizeau.

"Even with considerable experience in this, it takes two years before you can think of going into a referendum."

The former premier made the comments following a presentation to an all-party committee studying Quebec's counter legislation to the federal government's proposed referendum rules.

Parizeau supported the province's efforts to reaffirm the right of Quebecers alone to decide their future, calling the law the basis for a constitution.

Parizeau's remarks ran counter to recent statements by Premier Lucien Bouchard that the public is more interested in health care than sovereignty, a mood reflected in recent opinion polls.

Bouchard has also said the next referendum might have to wait until after the next provincial election in three or four years.

But Parizeau, who has openly criticized Bouchard for not doing enough to promote sovereignty, said referendum planning takes time.

Many of the numerous studies conducted prior to the 1995 referendum on issues such as the economic impact of sovereignty and how it would be implemented would be virtually useless today, he said.

They were done in an era of high federal and provincial deficits, meaning the merger of federal and Quebec tax systems, for example, would be done differently now.

"All of that study has to be completely refurbished," Parizeau said in English, something he has recently rarely chosen to do.

"You must also consult a number of people because the way they felt six or seven years ago and the way they feel today might have changed on a certain number of topics."

Following Parizeau's committee presentation, Liberal commitee member Benoit Pelletier asked Parizeau whether it was time for the public to be made fully aware of the former premier's plan to prop up the Canadian dollar if the Yes side had won in 1995.

Just after the referendum, Parizeau admitted Quebec had a war chest of billions of dollars ready to defend the loonie against an expected plunge.

Called Plan O, Bouchard refused to make it public when he took over from Parizeau.

Parizeau said Wednesday he was ready to discuss it openly.

Calling it a piece of Quebec's history, Parizeau said the PQ government had built up a reserve of $17 billion just days before the referendum and was ready for any eventuality.

Releasing the plan would show Quebec could easily resist financial pressures, he added.

The sovereignty debate has received more than its usual share of public attention in Quebec this week.

A new book released by a former adviser to Bouchard and Parizeau suggests Quebec should temporarily shelve its referendum plans and instead hold a vote on a list of powers it needs from Ottawa.

Jean-Francois Lisee's book, Emergency Exit, said a referendum on new powers for Quebec should be held before the next federal election.

Parizeau said he was not surprised by the book, adding it was not the first time front-line sovereigntists have become impatient.

"When it takes so long to attain sovereignty you have to be very, very persistent," said Parizeau.

"I don't believe very much in detours. I can see the temptation but it's not something I believe in."

The book drew criticism in Ottawa, with federal Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Stephane Dion calling its proposals "separation by the back door."

"They (sovereigntists) don't proposed improvements to Canada when they want to destroy Canada."



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